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Thread: Why NFL could close in 2011

  1. #1
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    Default Why NFL could close in 2011


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    Anyone read this article on Yahoo this morning?
    Thoughts...

    Yahoo! Sports - Sports News, Scores, Rumors, Fantasy Games, and more
    slug=ms-laborquestions090810
    **ChiefsChick**

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennBree View Post
    Anyone read this article on Yahoo this morning?
    Thoughts...

    Yahoo! Sports - Sports News, Scores, Rumors, Fantasy Games, and more
    slug=ms-laborquestions090810
    Link doesn't work.

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    poop....sorry... please see below
    Last edited by GlennBree; 09-09-2010 at 11:32 AM. Reason: UPDATE
    **ChiefsChick**

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    Roger Goodell was in the midst of a leisurely training camp tour last month when the NFL commissioner began experiencing severe labor pains.
    Goodell, as part of his weeklong bus trip to seven NFL camps with Hall of Fame coach and broadcasting icon John Madden, initiated locker-room meetings with players at each stop, and the level of interrogation he faced became increasingly charged as players expressed anxiety and anger over a potential lockout next spring.
    At one point in the commissioner’s visit with the Cleveland Browns, linebacker Scott Fujita(notes), a member of the NFL Players Association’s executive committee, asked: “What do the owners want? What’s it going to take to get a deal done?”
    “I can’t answer that,” Goodell replied.
    “You’re the NFL commissioner,” Fujita shot back. “You’re here as the mouthpiece for the owners, and you can’t even tell us what they want? The CBA [collective bargaining agreement] is up in March. Don’t you think you need to start giving us some answers?”
    By the end of his visit with the Browns, players were referring to the league’s chief executive as “Roger the Dodger.” It got worse for Goodell during the final visit of his tour, this stop coming at the Indianapolis Colts’ training camp. According to two sources familiar with the meeting, some Colts players admonished Goodell with swear words, to the point where star quarterback Peyton Manning(notes) was embarrassed by their behavior. Veteran center Jeff Saturday(notes), another executive committee member, cut the meeting short to keep the situation from escalating further.
    Welcome to the strange world of the 21st-century NFL, a wildly profitable business in uncertain economic times whose proprietors and employees can’t just get along. With the two sides seemingly headed for a rancorous and incongruous labor showdown next spring, America’s most prosperous and popular sporting enterprise could be walking a fine line between hard-fought progress and shameful self-immolation.
    Two years ago, when the owners voted unanimously to opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement following the 2010 season, it set the stage for a confrontation that could well result in the league’s first work stoppage since 1987. As the deadline for striking a new deal nears – things will likely come to a head on or around March 1 of next year – each camp is preparing for battle on numerous fronts. There has been legal wrangling, political maneuvering, spin-doctoring and economic leveraging by both sides … and much of it has been lost on a blissfully oblivious fan base.
    Internal NFLPA studies have shown that only 33 to 40 percent of hardcore NFL fans have the impending labor drama on their radar screens. For everyone else, the prospect of football interrupted – and the potential havoc it could wreak upon everything from video games to fantasy drafts – may come as an unwelcome shock.
    As we head into a season that could end with an abrupt dose of harsh reality, here’s a fan’s guide to the labor landscape based on exhaustive research and conversations with owners, NFLPA officials, players, agents and other league insiders.

    THIS IS JUST PART OF THE ARTICLE ON YAHOO
    **ChiefsChick**

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennBree View Post
    Roger Goodell was in the midst of a leisurely training camp tour last month when the NFL commissioner began experiencing severe labor pains.
    Goodell, as part of his weeklong bus trip to seven NFL camps with Hall of Fame coach and broadcasting icon John Madden, initiated locker-room meetings with players at each stop, and the level of interrogation he faced became increasingly charged as players expressed anxiety and anger over a potential lockout next spring.
    At one point in the commissioner’s visit with the Cleveland Browns, linebacker Scott Fujita(notes), a member of the NFL Players Association’s executive committee, asked: “What do the owners want? What’s it going to take to get a deal done?”
    “I can’t answer that,” Goodell replied.
    “You’re the NFL commissioner,” Fujita shot back. “You’re here as the mouthpiece for the owners, and you can’t even tell us what they want? The CBA [collective bargaining agreement] is up in March. Don’t you think you need to start giving us some answers?”
    By the end of his visit with the Browns, players were referring to the league’s chief executive as “Roger the Dodger.” It got worse for Goodell during the final visit of his tour, this stop coming at the Indianapolis Colts’ training camp. According to two sources familiar with the meeting, some Colts players admonished Goodell with swear words, to the point where star quarterback Peyton Manning(notes) was embarrassed by their behavior. Veteran center Jeff Saturday(notes), another executive committee member, cut the meeting short to keep the situation from escalating further.
    Welcome to the strange world of the 21st-century NFL, a wildly profitable business in uncertain economic times whose proprietors and employees can’t just get along. With the two sides seemingly headed for a rancorous and incongruous labor showdown next spring, America’s most prosperous and popular sporting enterprise could be walking a fine line between hard-fought progress and shameful self-immolation.
    Two years ago, when the owners voted unanimously to opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement following the 2010 season, it set the stage for a confrontation that could well result in the league’s first work stoppage since 1987. As the deadline for striking a new deal nears – things will likely come to a head on or around March 1 of next year – each camp is preparing for battle on numerous fronts. There has been legal wrangling, political maneuvering, spin-doctoring and economic leveraging by both sides … and much of it has been lost on a blissfully oblivious fan base.
    Internal NFLPA studies have shown that only 33 to 40 percent of hardcore NFL fans have the impending labor drama on their radar screens. For everyone else, the prospect of football interrupted – and the potential havoc it could wreak upon everything from video games to fantasy drafts – may come as an unwelcome shock.
    As we head into a season that could end with an abrupt dose of harsh reality, here’s a fan’s guide to the labor landscape based on exhaustive research and conversations with owners, NFLPA officials, players, agents and other league insiders.

    THIS IS JUST PART OF THE ARTICLE ON YAHOO
    Setting up a new CBA seems like it would be easy. Keep the hard cap, keep it a percentage of revenues, set a rookie scale, and improve the healthcare/retirement plan for the guys who make less than $1M over their football career (about 80% of the league).

    Oh, and I know the owners really want 18 games. It's a terrible idea.

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    Both sides will have to give and take. I have very little concern over two groups who earn more in one season than I'll make in one lifetime. Both sides need to suck it up and get it done or go the way of the Dodo.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster View Post
    Both sides will have to give and take. I have very little concern over two groups who earn more in one season than I'll make in one lifetime. Both sides need to suck it up and get it done or go the way of the Dodo.
    That's right and get a $%&#ing rookie salary scale in place. The teams drafting in the top 10 are getting screwed royally and they can't trade out because nobody wants to pay the outrageous rookie pay scale that is in place right now.

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    so much turmoil over 16 games or 18 games...is it really that hard? 17 games and 3 preseason...boom...happy medium

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster View Post
    Both sides will have to give and take. I have very little concern over two groups who earn more in one season than I'll make in one lifetime. Both sides need to suck it up and get it done or go the way of the Dodo.
    No chance of that happening. Most NFL owners are incredibly egotistical and would have a heart attack if it meant the players getting what they wanted over the owners. I'm calling no football in 2011 unless a miracle happens.
    C:\Users\Master Sin\Desktop\thumb_pl_180492.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Three7s View Post
    No chance of that happening. Most NFL owners are incredibly egotistical and would have a heart attack if it meant the players getting what they wanted over the owners. I'm calling no football in 2011 unless a miracle happens.
    There are things on both side that are going to have to happen, but remember, the people who get squeezed the most in all of this are the fans.

    If the players get what they want, and the number one issue is the salary cap, then that is going to drive up ticket, concession, merchandising and TV costs because that money to pay those guys has to come from somewhere. Yeah, I know everyone thinks that rich people just have endless amounts of money that can be taken from them, but that is not reality.

    Salary caps need to stay in place. Additionally, they need to put something in place to get rookie contracts under control. I think the compromise here is that high pick rookies will be paid on a percentage of the highest paid players at that position, sort of like the franchise tag works. I also think you will see that the picks in the lesser rounds will get more money than they have been getting. Either through signing bonuses or contracts.

    I think that is a sensible agreement. I don't believe the lockout will go past the start of spring training though. All of these guys realize that no football means no revenue. Either by salary or ticket sales.


    Are you man enough? Eric Berry? Apparently Not!

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